WEIGHT LOSS

Your weight is a balancing act, and calories are part of that equation. Weight loss comes down to burning more calories than you take in. You can do that by reducing extra calories from food and beverages, and increasing calories burned through physical activity. While that seems simple, it can be challenging to implement a practical, effective and sustainable weight-loss plan. But you don't have to do it alone. Talk to your doctor, family, and friends for support. Ask yourself if now is a good time and if you're ready to make some necessary changes. Also, plan smart: Anticipate how you'll handle situations that challenge your resolve and the inevitable minor setbacks. If you have serious health problems because of your weight, your doctor may suggest weight-loss surgery or medications for you. In this case, your doctor will discuss the potential benefits and the possible risks with you. But don't forget the bottom line: The key to successful weight loss is a commitment to making changes in your diet and exercise habits. Diet plans When it comes to weight loss, there's no shortage of diet plans. Check any magazine rack, and you're bound to see the latest and greatest diet plans. But how do you know if a diet plan fits your needs and lifestyle? Ask yourself these questions about any diet plan you're considering: Does it include various foods from the major food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, lean protein sources and nuts? Does it include foods you like and that you would enjoy eating for a lifetime not just for several weeks or months? Can you easily find these foods in your local grocery store? Will you be able to eat your favorite foods or, better yet, all foods (even if some are in small quantities)? Does it fit your lifestyle and budget? Does it include proper amounts of nutrients and calories to help you lose weight safely and effectively? Is regular physical activity part of the plan? If the answer to any of these questions is no, keep looking. There are better diet plans out there for you. Diet and exercise The key to successful weight loss is developing healthy diet and exercise habits. You may not like those words diet and exercise. But don't get hung up on them. Diet just means eating healthy, lower-calorie meals. Exercise means being more physically active. Although people appropriately focus on diet when they're trying to lose weight, being active also is an essential component of a weight-loss program. When you're active, your body uses energy (calories) to move, helping to burn the calories you take in with the food you eat. Cleaning the house, making the bed, shopping, mowing, and gardening are all forms of physical activity. Exercise, on the other hand, is a structured and repetitive form of physical activity that you do on a regular basis. Whatever activity you choose, do it regularly. Aim for at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity preferably spread throughout the week. Keep in mind that you may need more physical activity to lose weight and keep it off. Diet pills, supplements, and surgery Diet pills and surgery can help with weight loss when combined with a healthy diet and physical activity. But diet pills aren't for everyone. Neither is surgery. If you're obese and have weight-related health problems, talk with your doctor about whether diet pills or surgery could help you lose weight. Your doctor will also counsel you about the lifestyle changes you'll need to make to be successful over the long term. A word of caution: Talk with your doctor before you try over-the-counter diet pills or supplements. They can have serious side effects; some can be downright dangerous. 5 ways to boost your weight-loss confidence The stronger your belief is that you can accomplish a goal or change a behavior, the better your chances of success are. You can take steps to increase your confidence in your ability to lose weight. There's no doubt about it: Changing habits is hard. So if you've had weight-loss disappoints in the past, it's understandable that your confidence in making lasting changes might be low. However, the stronger your belief is that you can accomplish a goal or change a behavior, the better your chances of success are. Behavioral experts call this self-efficacy. And it can make or break your weight-loss efforts. Think about how you view yourself. Are you struggling to believe in your ability to lose weight? It's normal to feel apprehensive in the beginning. But with practice you can improve your sense of self-efficacy and boost your confidence. Try these strategies: Set realistic expectations. Do you expect immediate results? It's common to set goals that aren't realistic. For example, you may set yourself up for failure if you go from not exercising at all to trying to work out for an hour every day. Instead, focus on small, achievable changes, such as walking for at least 10 minutes daily, so you can experience feelings of success every week. As you achieve small goals, your self-confidence will improve and you can build up to larger changes. Recognize success. Take time to celebrate your accomplishments, no matter how small. Did you take the stairs instead of the escalator one day? Eat a healthy breakfast three days in a row? Give yourself a pat on the back. You may not usually acknowledge the small things, but doing so will help you stay positive and confident. Maintain a learning mindset. Accept that setbacks will occur. How you deal with obstacles impacts your confidence and will to keep going. Approach challenges with an open mind. Refrain from judging yourself, and reflect on the experience by using it as an opportunity to grow. Ask yourself, "What can I learn from this experience?" Practice positive self-talk. Self-talk is your inner dialogue what you say to yourself in any given moment. With practice, you can begin to change negative thoughts into positive ones. For example, instead of saying, "I'll never reach my weight-loss goal," try, "Reaching my goal weight takes time, but I can do it if I stick to it." Find healthy support. The people closest to you may feel intimidated by your desire to make healthy changes. Tell them how important their support is and what they can do to encourage you. Be sure to connect with others who have similar goals. If you see others achieving similar goals, you're more likely to believe you can accomplish your goals, too. Experiments Connect with a friend or family member who is also working on healthy changes. Discuss ways to support each other. For example, check in regularly over the phone or plan weekly walking dates. Catch negative thoughts that pop into your mind throughout the day and turn them into positive reinforcements. Instead of saying, "I can't stick with an exercise program," try, "I can meet one realistic goal today." Make a list of daily accomplishments, no matter how small. Add to this list every day. This allows you to focus on what is going well in your life, instead of what isn't.

  • Address

    New Zealand

  • Hotline

    +64-220-329-916

  • Email contact

    info@goodreliefpharmas.com

  • Website

    www.goodreliefpharmas.com